Coffee Is Good For Your Brain

Posted Wed, 06/24/2009 - 3:46am by Fred Lee

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Drinking coffee may be more than just an enjoyable way to being your day, it might help promote mental health later in life, as well. In fact, a study out of Europe suggests that drinking upwards of three to five cups (or more) a day could possibly reduce the incidence of dementia, including Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).

It has been postulated that the root causes of dementia and AD might begin decades before that actual symptoms appear. Coupled with the lack of knowledge about caffeine’s long term effects on the central nervous system, the researchers studied their relationship by focusing on coffee drinkers in mid-life and following up with them later in life (21 years, on average), when symptoms of dementia more commonly appear.

What they found was that subjects in the moderate consumption group (3-5 cups/day) experienced a decreased level of dementia than those in the low consumption group (0-2 cups/day). Even after adjustments were made for socioeconomic circumstances and health considerations (hypertension, high cholesterol), the moderate consumption group had a 65% lower risk, while those in the high consumption group (more than 5 cups/day) displayed a similar reduction in risk, though the results were not statistically significant.

While the doctors who headed the study are not yet advocating coffee as a miracle drug, the results are nonetheless interesting, especially in light of coffees popularity - it has been estimated that 80% of the people in this country and up to half of the world’s population drink coffee every day.

Which is interesting when you consider that coffee has often carried with it certain negative connotations in regards to our health, not the least of which is addiction. That, however, is slowly beginning to change as coffee’s list of potential health benefits continues to grow, including cancer prevention, alleviating chronic disease, and now, reducing dementia.

Dementia is defined as the loss of mental functions, including reasoning and memory, and is generally more a symptom of a disease or condition rather than the actual cause. In extreme cases it can severely disrupt a person’s daily life to the point that they could lose their independence. In most cases, dementia cannot be cured, though if the root cause can be addressed (including substance abuse, diet, and sleep deprivation), then there is a greater chance of reducing or eliminating the dementia itself.

Why coffee might help to lessen the severity of dementia is not yet known, but previous data seems to supports its potential preventative capabilities. It has been suggested that coffee might reduce one’s susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, which can increase one’s risk for dementia. In animal models, caffeine was shown to reduce the formation of amyloid plaques that are associated with AD. Coffee also increases blood flow to the brain, and there is a wealth of anecdotal evidence that it can lessen the severity of headaches.

So the next time you’re taking part your morning routine, take heart in the fact that that cup of coffee you’re enjoying may impart mental health benefits. You never know, one day it might even help you remember where you left your keys.
 

Comments

1

This study indicates that

Submitted by Guest on Fri, 10/23/2009 - 5:15am.

This study indicates that caffeine consumption reduces cerebral blood flow by up to 27%:

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122199602/abstract

here's another article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/11/health/vital-signs-testing-when-coffee...

2

 you have made a good point

Submitted by Terry on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 4:11pm.

 you have made a good point here about reduced blood flow. This has been researched quite extensively.

Again although chocolate has some beneficial nutrients the caffeine in it is not so crash hot for the body.

Everyone is recommending dark chocolate but milk chocolate may be less harmful to the body as it has less caffeine in it.

As always moderation is the key

3

Okay, i've done some

Submitted by Shanice Calvent on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 12:26pm.

Okay, i've done some research and have asked a few people but I want to know if you guys have any advice on this.. . Do you know of any ways to keep tinnitus in check?. . So far, I know if you drink alcohol, it doesn't bother you, valium is the same, and I smoke weed.. I have also heard dramamine works.. So any other ideas?. Please help. . . By the way, i've asked a doctor friend of mine and he said that mairijuana does help by calming your nerves.. So all you anti-marijuana people, I have a doctor telling me its okay so stop saying it is not.. You do not have a diploma from a recognized medical school.. There is no actual proven fact that marijuana smoke is addictive.. Plus, it is legal for medicinal purposes in many states. So it is not illegal..

4

 with regards to tinnitus

Submitted by Terry on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 4:03pm.

 with regards to tinnitus there is a very good chance that Lifewave acupuncture patches would help you.

Probably the Energy patches. You could either hold them against your ears or place them on the acupuncture point Gb2

http://www.lifewave.com/sportingedge

The following info is compliments of acupuncture.com

 

Gall Bladder 2

Chinese Name: Tinghui (English translation: Hearing Convergence)

Location: On the face, anterior to the inter-tragus notch, at the posterior border of the condyloid process of the mandible. When the mouth is open, the point is in the depression.

Indications:

  • Tinnitus, deafness
  • Toothache
  • Wry mouth

Functions: Dispels Wind, benefits the eyes, clears Heat, alleviates pain.

Needling: Perpendicular insertion .5 - 1.0 cun with the mouth open....not necessary if the patches are used

 

5

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